OUR STORY

Osei-Duro uses traditional textile techniques to produce contemporary garments. Based in the USA, Ghana, and Canada, we aim to support local apparel industries in becoming more sustainable. We believe that economic and environmental sustainability and justice are intrinsically linked, and we encourage international exchange of ideas and information.

The genesis of Osei-Duro can be traced back to high school, when Maryanne Mathias and Molly Keogh met at the Vancouver Waldorf School, and bonded over a fascination with clothing. Mathias went on to complete a fashion design degree and was an independent designer before receiving her MBA from The University of British Columbia. Keogh completed her BFA in Fashion Design at the California College of the Arts and worked as a costume maker and stylist on projects ranging from films to fine art to advertising. She would later earn an MA in African Studies from Indiana University.

In 2008, a high school reunion brought the two back together. Mathias had just completed a journey around the world, designing mini-collections in a variety of countries, and was excited to further explore the possibilities of designing internationally. Keogh agreed to an exploratory trip to Ghana, a place of rich textile histories. The original dream was to travel to different countries and design collections based on the various textiles found.

OUR STORY

Osei-Duro uses traditional textile techniques to produce contemporary garments. Based in the USA, Ghana, and Canada, we aim to support local apparel industries in becoming more sustainable. We believe that economic and environmental sustainability and justice are intrinsically linked, and we encourage international exchange of ideas and information.

The genesis of Osei-Duro can be traced back to high school, when Maryanne Mathias and Molly Keogh met at the Vancouver Waldorf School, and bonded over a fascination with clothing. Mathias went on to complete a fashion design degree and was an independent designer before receiving her MBA from The University of British Columbia. Keogh completed her BFA in Fashion Design at the California College of the Arts and worked as a costume maker and stylist on projects ranging from films to fine art to advertising. She would later earn an MA in African Studies from Indiana University.

In 2008, a high school reunion brought the two back together. Mathias had just completed a journey around the world, designing mini-collections in a variety of countries, and was excited to further explore the possibilities of designing internationally. Keogh agreed to an exploratory trip to Ghana, a place of rich textile histories. The original dream was to travel to different countries and design collections based on the various textiles found.

In March 2009, after nine months of saving and planning, Keogh and Mathias went to Ghana together to start a “one time” design project. When they realized the amount of infrastructure needed to actualize small scale high quality garment production, they made the decision to stay in Ghana longer term.

The first few (ok, six or seven) years were rocky. Mathias and Keogh did other jobs to survive, and did just about everything themselves. Osei-Duro made some questionable products, and some great ones. The brand got screwed by big retailers, as is standard in this industry. We had some thrilling and unexpected successes. The learning curve was intense, and we learned almost everything by doing. Still do. We learned how to hire, how to train. Our team grew to include some truly incredible people. We never took on investment. We thought about quitting often. We reinvented a lot of wheels. We stressed hard. We messed up, and self corrected. We were saved often by supportive friends with valuable advice, donated elbow grease, and sometimes money to loan. (Thank you friends. You know who you are.) And somehow we survived. And then somewhere around year eight or nine we looked up and realized that there were alot of us, and that we‘d created something that was working, something that was supporting a lot of people’s lives and growth. It felt surreal, and it still feels that way. Here we are, 12 years in; a small experimental dream has somehow become over a decade of design and development and livelihood.

PRODUCTION

It is our goal to promote small scale artisan production, and as such we are proud to help artisans improve and expand their work, whatever that means for them. Mediums we have worked with include hand batik, botanical dyes such as natural indigo and onion skins, hand weaving and ikat, recycled brass casting (lost wax), hand crochet and machine knitting, silkscreen, quilting, woodcarving, leather shoe making, glass beads, soft sculpture and performance. Over time, we have seen the greatest demand for our hand batiked dresses and jumpsuits, and that is where the majority of our production now focuses. We continue to experiment with new processes as often as we can.

We dye and sew everything we make here in Ghana, contracting with local artisans and manufacturers. We are very hands on in this process, with our team in the production facilities weekly to ensure quality and consistency. Partnership around problem solving and improvements are pretty constant, and we’re a bit obsessed with communication. Our contractors set their prices, and we dialogue frequently about pricing, as currency and costs fluctuate a lot around here.

PRODUCTION

It is our goal to promote small scale artisan production, and as such we are proud to help artisans improve and expand their work, whatever that means for them. Mediums we have worked with include hand batik, botanical dyes such as natural indigo and onion skins, hand weaving and ikat, recycled brass casting (lost wax), hand crochet and machine knitting, silkscreen, quilting, woodcarving, leather shoe making, glass beads, soft sculpture and performance. Over time, we have seen the greatest demand for our hand batiked dresses and jumpsuits, and that is where the majority of our production now focuses. We continue to experiment with new processes as often as we can.

We dye and sew everything we make here in Ghana, contracting with local artisans and manufacturers. We are very hands on in this process, with our team in the production facilities weekly to ensure quality and consistency. Partnership around problem solving and improvements are pretty constant, and we’re a bit obsessed with communication. Our contractors set their prices, and we dialogue frequently about pricing, as currency and costs fluctuate a lot around here.

PATTERNMAKING - We proudly do almost all of our patternmaking and grading in house, and occasionally contract with an independent patternmaker in Vancouver BC. Martha Yurobo, who is an an accountant by training, has been learning patternmaking and grading over the last few years, both through courses at the newly created GATS Centre at ATTC, and through helping Molly and Maryanne (who develop most of the new patterns). This year Martha gained her own apprentice, Grace, who will attend the GATS program when it reopens.

SOURCING - We source our fabric in Ghana whenever it’s available here (cotton, linen and handwovens for now), and the rest we currently buy from China and India (rayon, silk, silk blends). We have high hopes that the new All Africa Trade Agreement (AfCFTA) will soon mean we can source everything on the continent, which is a goal. Notions (buttons, labels, zips) and thread are currently sourced from Asia, but we have found sources recently in South Africa that we hope to be able to afford soon.

HANDWOVENS - Our handwoven fabrics (used in the Theca coat and the Partare Tote for instance) are sourced from artisan weavers and dyers in Northern Ghana and Burkina Faso. Some of these weavers are growing and spinning their own cotton, and some are growing and processing their own natural plant and mineral dyes. Some are buying imported cotton yarns and/or synthetic imported dyes.

COTTON - Our cotton fabric is currently sourced from Woodin, which is a local brand that belongs to Vlisco, a Dutch waxprint brand. Vlisco imports the cotton fabric to Ghana from Holland. We eagerly await the return of cotton broadcloth production to Ghana - if you want to support this please come on down! The machines are sitting in factories gathering dust.

LINEN - Our linen fabric is bought from traders in the local market here, and is the “mill ends” that they import, most commonly from countries including Tunisia and China. This is a fabric we are particularly optimistic about being able to directly source on the continent soon.

RAYON - In 2020 we started purchasing LENZING™ ECOVERO™ rayon, and in 2021 we are on track to replace all of our rayon with this more sustainable option. It’s not perfect, but it’s a start. You can read more about LENZING™ ECOVERO™ here.

NATURAL FIBRES - We use almost exclusively natural materials, which will biodegrade overtime. One exception is the nylon lining of our Partare Totes. We use minimal notions, such as zippers or plastic buttons which is a small way of making our products easier to recycle and biodegrade.

COTTON - Our cotton fabric is currently sourced from Woodin, which is a local brand that belongs to Vlisco, a Dutch waxprint brand. Vlisco imports the cotton fabric to Ghana from Holland. We eagerly await the return of cotton broadcloth production to Ghana - if you want to support this please come on down! The machines are sitting in factories gathering dust.

LINEN - Our linen fabric is bought from traders in the local market here, and is the “mill ends” that they import, most commonly from countries including Tunisia and China. This is a fabric we are particularly optimistic about being able to directly source on the continent soon.

RAYON - In 2020 we started purchasing LENZING™ ECOVERO™ rayon, and in 2021 we are on track to replace all of our rayon with this more sustainable option. It’s not perfect, but it’s a start. You can read more about LENZING™ ECOVERO™ here.

NATURAL FIBRES - We use almost exclusively natural materials, which will biodegrade overtime. One exception is the nylon lining of our Partare Totes. We use minimal notions, such as zippers or plastic buttons which is a small way of making our products easier to recycle and biodegrade.

DYEING - We currently dye our cloth with two small independent dye houses in Greater Accra. The dyers purchase the dyes and other materials (cooking gas, wax, tools) from the local markets in Ghana, from small vendors who import them. The dyes we primarily use are synthetic dyes; vat and reactive. Juliana Mustapha has a worksite in Kasoa, where she employs three assistants, and Nana Aboagye works from his home in La Paz where he employs nine assistants. We are currently partnering with another batik business in Ghana on developing a low-tech wastewater treatment process for batikers. The aim of this treatment is to greatly reduce the amount of chemicals that enter the sewage system through filtration, and to reduce the water consumption of the batik process through reclamation. We are sometimes asked why we don’t switch to all botanical dyes. While we like this idea as much as the next hippie, it is unfortunately pretty problematic in our context. Natural dyes are not produced here, so they would need to be imported (or a local industry created). Their higher prices would dramatically increase the prices of our garments, as they are mostly marketed to individuals, not industry. The colors available are totally different from the ones we are using, and this switch would also require completely retraining the batikers, as well as retrofitting their workspaces. The above is alot, but it could be done, given the time and resources. However, most natural dyes must be applied through a hot water process, and batik requires cold water dye application. The wax melts right off if the dye bath is hot. Anyone who has solutions to this barrier - we are all ears! We believe that the dyes we use are the part of our process that has the greatest negative impact environmentally. They are also part of what makes this hand work special, creating somewhat of a conundrum. We are working now to source cleaner dyes directly from manufacturers.

FACTORIES - We contract with small sewing facilities around Greater Accra to produce our garments. Some are as small as one person on a hand crank machine, while some are as large as 100 sewers. Most are 3-10 sewers working together. We pay by the piece, at rates that the sewers negotiate. Contrary to popular conception, sewing rates in Ghana are comparable to the western world. We are in the sewing facilities frequently, and have direct dialogue with the people handling the work. We are in process on a Factory Standards Agreement, which will be a document listing standards requirements we require our sewers and dyers to participate in, with a path towards participation, to be financially supported by us. We aim to have this agreement in action by the beginning of 2022, and once it is ready you will see it here.

SHIPPING - In 2020 we moved to shipping our raw materials to Ghana by boat, as we finally had the resources to order large enough quantities to justify the wait. We ship our finished products weekly from Ghana to an independent fulfillment center in Colorado using DHL, as the majority of our customers are in North America. When orders are placed through the website the fulfillers ship using the Postal Service whenever possible, or courier services as needed. In 2018 we started using compostable mailers, and over time we have converted most of our packaging to compostable. As you may know this industry is very young, and products are improving rapidly in quality and in price. We are too small to meet the minimums of some of the larger producers, but we hope to get there soon. Our goal is to have all of our mailers and garment bags be fully home compostable by the beginning of 2022.

FACTORIES - We contract with small sewing facilities around Greater Accra to produce our garments. Some are as small as one person on a hand crank machine, while some are as large as 100 sewers. Most are 3-10 sewers working together. We pay by the piece, at rates that the sewers negotiate. Contrary to popular conception, sewing rates in Ghana are comparable to the western world. We are in the sewing facilities frequently, and have direct dialogue with the people handling the work. We are in process on a Factory Standards Agreement, which will be a document listing standards requirements we require our sewers and dyers to participate in, with a path towards participation, to be financially supported by us. We aim to have this agreement in action by the beginning of 2022, and once it is ready you will see it here.

SHIPPING - In 2020 we moved to shipping our raw materials to Ghana by boat, as we finally had the resources to order large enough quantities to justify the wait. We ship our finished products weekly from Ghana to an independent fulfillment center in Colorado using DHL, as the majority of our customers are in North America. When orders are placed through the website the fulfillers ship using the Postal Service whenever possible, or courier services as needed. In 2018 we started using compostable mailers, and over time we have converted most of our packaging to compostable. As you may know this industry is very young, and products are improving rapidly in quality and in price. We are too small to meet the minimums of some of the larger producers, but we hope to get there soon. Our goal is to have all of our mailers and garment bags be fully home compostable by the beginning of 2022.

Numbers

Country spending breakdown  
Canada 12%
China and India 11%
Ghana 43%
Other 3%
US 31%
   
Total 100%

2019 SPENDING AS % OF REVENUE  
Advertising 7%
Bank Fees 2%
Contract labour 19%
Debt Service 2%
Materials 13%
Other 1%
Payroll 25%
Postage/Freight/Import Duties 18%
Professional Fees 1%
Profit 3%
Rent 3%
Taxes 4%
Travel/Transport 2%
TOTAL 100%

Numbers

Country spending breakdown  
Canada 12%
China and India 11%
Ghana 43%
Other 3%
US 31%
   
Total 100%

2019 SPENDING AS % OF REVENUE  
Advertising 7%
Bank Fees 2%
Contract labour 19%
Debt Service 2%
Materials 13%
Other 1%
Payroll 25%
Postage/Freight/Import Duties 18%
Professional Fees 1%
Profit 3%
Rent 3%
Taxes 4%
Travel/Transport 2%
TOTAL 100%

OUR WORKPLACE

Osei-Duro currently employs 13 people full time here in Ghana, as well as one part time employee in Los Angeles and one in Vancouver. The brand is currently owned by two white women; Molly Keogh and Maryanne Mathias.

TEAM MEMBER PROFILES - GHANA

Beatrice Azu: Janitor, started in 2018.
Happy Ketini: Head of Shipping, Local Sales Manager, and Head of HR. Started in 2018.
Josephine Ashun: Production Manager, started in 2019.
Ken Botchway: QC Associate, started in 2021.
Kwaku Dagaati: Head of QC, board member, started in 2012.
Kwame Bismark Owusu: QC Associate, started in 2020.
Martha Yurobo: Head Patternmaker and Technical Lead, board member, started in 2014.
Maxwell Niwiiri: QC Associate, started in 2019.
Molly Keogh: owner/founder, board member, started in 2009.
Peter Niwiiri: QC Associate, started in 2019.
Sandra Dadzie: QC Associate, started in 2020.
Sandra Ofosua: Administrative Assistant, started in 2020.
Stella Foli: Childcare Provider, started in 2018.

TEAM MEMBER PROFILES - VANCOUVER

Heather Young: Patternmaker, Reruns coordinator, started in 2020.
Maryanne Mathias: owner/founder, board member, started in 2009.

TEAM MEMBER PROFILES - LOS ANGELES

Maria Pineres: sourcing and admin, started in 2019.

We are currently 13 total employees here in Accra: 62% are women, and 46% are parents. 30% of us have tertiary degrees, while 70% have a senior high school degree or less. 62% of us were unemployed or financially vulnerable prior to our current jobs. Everyone on our team in Accra is Ghanaian aside from Molly, our co-founder, who is American. We are committed to being a great place to work, where everyone's voice is heard and their needs are met. We value clear communication, mutual respect and teamwork. Everyone at Osei-Duro should feel valued and heard while at work, and free to express ideas, opinions and concerns.

We work to grow and thrive together and we have great retention, no one has quit in years. The benefits of our jobs include:

TEAM MEMBER PROFILES - VANCOUVER

Heather Young: Patternmaker, Reruns coordinator, started in 2020.
Maryanne Mathias: owner/founder, board member, started in 2009.

TEAM MEMBER PROFILES - LOS ANGELES

Maria Pineres: sourcing and admin, started in 2019.

We are currently 13 total employees here in Accra: 62% are women, and 46% are parents. 30% of us have tertiary degrees, while 70% have a senior high school degree or less. 62% of us were unemployed or financially vulnerable prior to our current jobs. Everyone on our team in Accra is Ghanaian aside from Molly, our co-founder, who is American. We are committed to being a great place to work, where everyone's voice is heard and their needs are met. We value clear communication, mutual respect and teamwork. Everyone at Osei-Duro should feel valued and heard while at work, and free to express ideas, opinions and concerns.

We work to grow and thrive together and we have great retention, no one has quit in years. The benefits of our jobs include:

- Work week: We take full time pay for a four day work week (standard in Ghana is six days) and have three weeks paid vacation per year. We take full pay during pandemic lockdowns and other forces majeures.

- Wage: We earn above a living wage, and take earnings of two to five times our previous incomes. Our income is sufficient not only to live on, but to also enable a change in circumstance for the individual and their family.

- Profit-sharing: 5% of our 2020 annual profits were shared between all Ghana employees, with individual percentages based on years worked.

- Pension: Osei-Duro remits 13.5% of each employee’s salary, (beyond the salary itself) to Ghana’s government sponsored pension plan (SSNIT). Each employee is expected to contribute the remaining 5%, as stipulated by law.

- Parental Leave: We take three months full pay maternity leave, plus one year of one hour paid per workday for nursing or pumping and additional benefits as the law provides, and two weeks full pay paternity leave (which is not legally required).

- Medical: We can take unlimited sick days, are covered for prescription eyewear, emergency health coverage, and annual wellness exams. We also can take yoga classes and nutritional workshops for free.

- Financial Services: Osei-Duro has a matching savings program, as well as interest-free loans, and emergency short-term housing. - Childcare: We provide childcare, and strive to be a family friendly workplace. Children are welcome in the office as needed.

- Career development: We have paid career development; from leadership workshops to technical trainings to further certificates.

TESTIMONIALS

Kwaku, Head of QC, Board Member, Osei-Duro Foundation:
I think if my memory serve me right, I came to this company as an errand and still perform the duty of a quality controller (Q.C). It’s been eight years since I joined the company and until then my life have been improved, because I have been able to take up so many responsibilities both at the work and home as well. This company has taken me to places I have never dream of, I have met prominent people and several other friends with different backgrounds. Personally my vision is to see this company develop across the length and breadth of this country. My second vision is that my beloved company should try and venture into table cloth, curtains, bedsheets and locally made earrings. And also the company could employ more workers and increase productivity at work place. In this regard I wish to express that all of us the staff, should put in our best to ensure that the vision of the company is realised especially in the area of honesty and hard work at work thank you.

ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT

As starry eyed fashion students at the turn of the millennium, we were pretty vague on how much waste the fashion world produces. We didn’t realize to what extent fashion is truly an industry, in the industrial sense. How ignorant we were - the textile industry is one of the largest polluters in the world! The negative environmental (and therefore social) impact of textile manufacturing is something we really struggle with now. “Can you consume your way out of a consumption problem?” is a question we often ask ourselves. As in, is there any right way to do this?

We are small, but our choices still matter. For scale, we currently make approximately 8,000-10,000 garments per year, as compared to H&M’s 3,000,0000,000 garments per year. We are 1/30,000 of their size. But for us this doesn’t mean we can forget about our impact. We think a lot about how to move away from the current fast fashion model, how to create alternative systems. Maybe we can lead by example, or at least shift the status quo and the conversation. Here are the things we are currently doing, and the things we know we still need to do, in order for Osei-Duro to be doing as much as absolutely possible to have a positive environmental impact.

ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT

As starry eyed fashion students at the turn of the millennium, we were pretty vague on how much waste the fashion world produces. We didn’t realize to what extent fashion is truly an industry, in the industrial sense. How ignorant we were - the textile industry is one of the largest polluters in the world! The negative environmental (and therefore social) impact of textile manufacturing is something we really struggle with now. “Can you consume your way out of a consumption problem?” is a question we often ask ourselves. As in, is there any right way to do this?

We are small, but our choices still matter. For scale, we currently make approximately 8,000-10,000 garments per year, as compared to H&M’s 3,000,0000,000 garments per year. We are 1/30,000 of their size. But for us this doesn’t mean we can forget about our impact. We think a lot about how to move away from the current fast fashion model, how to create alternative systems. Maybe we can lead by example, or at least shift the status quo and the conversation. Here are the things we are currently doing, and the things we know we still need to do, in order for Osei-Duro to be doing as much as absolutely possible to have a positive environmental impact.

PACKAGING - In 2018 we started using compostable mailers, and over time we have converted the majority of our packaging to compostable. As you may know this industry is very young, and products are improving rapidly in quality and in price. The devil is really in the details with this stuff. For instance the first compostable garment bags we bought we not resealable, meaning we used many more of them that the old cellophane resealable ones. We’ve learned the difference between biodegradable and compostable (mostly to do with how long it takes to break down, compostable is faster). We’ve also learned the important difference between industrially compostable materials (certain high temperatures must be reached) and home compostable ones (bury it in the garden style). The latter is much preferable for us, as many of our customers don’t have realistic access to industrial composting facilities. Our goal is to have all of our mailers and garment bags be fully home compostable by the beginning of 2022.

FABRIC WASTE- We do not throw away any of our textile off cuts from our production. We save them, use them and give them away to customers, quilters, artists, schools, non-profits, makers; anyone who will come and get them. Read more about our scrap program here.

RERUNS BUYBACK PROGRAM - The aim of our Reruns program is to provide job skills and training to women in recovery who live in Vancouver’s Downtown East Side, while simultaneously closing the loop on our own textile waste. Vancouver’s Downtown East Side is home to one of the worst drug problems in North America. It homes a disproportionate number of First Nations people, has a high rate of drug use and opioid overdoses, decrepit and squalid housing, and a high prevalence of severe mental illness (which often co-occurs with addiction).

The program is a partnership between the Osei-Duro, The Union Gospel Mission, and the City of Vancouver and aims to provide a stepping stone in the continuum of employment, building on UGM’s Repair to Wear’s outstanding success.

WEAR MORE, WASH LESS - We are strong advocates of wear more and wash less. Most of the garments we make can go several wears before they need to be laundered (pending your humidity circumstances and proximity to small children etc, of course). A hand steamer and spot cleaning can go a long way! Less washing not only reduces your water and energy consumption, it also helps your garment to last longer.

LENZIG RAYON - In 2020 we started purchasing LENZING™ ECOVERO™ rayon, and in 2021 we are on track to replace all of our rayon with this more sustainable option. It’s not perfect, but it’s a start.

LENZING™ ECOVERO™ fibers are derived from certified renewable wood sources using an eco-responsible production process by meeting high environmental standards. - 50% lower emissions and water than normal rayon - sustainable wood and pulp sourcing procurement - supply chain transparency

In the future we hope to move towards organic cotton. As of yet we cannot purchase organic cotton in Ghana, so it will take time to make this transition.

Organic vs Conventional Cotton We are looking into organic cotton broadcloth, to replace the conventional cotton we currently use. We would love to be able to buy this locally, but haven’t found a source on the continent yet. Open to any and all leads!

DYES - Our dye process is the area of focus we are working on now. We currently dye our cloth with two small independent dye houses in Greater Accra. The dyers purchase the dyes and other materials (cooking gas, wax, tools) from the local markets in Ghana, from small vendors who import them. The dyes we primarily use are synthetic dyes; vat and reactive. We are currently partnering with another batik business in Ghana on developing a low-tech wastewater treatment process for batikers. The aim of this treatment is to greatly reduce the amount of chemicals that enter the sewage system through filtration, and to reduce the water consumption of the batik process through reclamation. We are sometimes asked why we don’t switch to all botanical dyes. While we like this idea as much as the next hippie, it is unfortunately pretty problematic in our context. Natural dyes are not produced here, so they would need to be imported (or a local industry created). Their higher prices would dramatically increase the prices of our garments, as they are mostly marketed to individuals, not industry. The colors available are totally different from the ones we are using, and this switch would also require completely retraining the batikers, as well as retrofitting their workspaces. The above is alot, but it could be done, given the time and resources. However, most natural dyes must be applied through a hot water process, and batik requires cold water dye application. The wax melts right off if the dye bath is hot. Anyone who has solutions to this barrier - we are all ears! We believe that the dyes we use are the part of our process that has the greatest negative impact environmentally. They are also part of what makes this hand work special, creating somewhat of a conundrum. We are working now to source cleaner dyes directly from manufacturers. Currently our dyers put the dye wastewater into the municipal sewers. We are working with Global Mama’s to develop a low-cost waste water solution. We are about halfway through the development and hope to roll it out to all our dyers in……

Currently we purchase our dyes from the market in Accra and we don’t know the chemicals in them. We are working on both testing the dyes in the country, and well as a bulk purchase of the least damaging dyes available.

FUTURE

By mid-2022 our goals are to:

- Hire a Ghanaian Head of Country - this is in the works now!
- Implement a wastewater treatment system for batikers: we are working with Global Mamas and an expert to develop a lowtech system, which we will put into action with the dyers we partner with.
- Move to all sustainable rayons (Lenzig), source organic cotton and linen on the African continent.
- Switch all fabric import shipping to sea.
- Create an in-house production and training facility for design, patternmaking, garment production and dyeing.
- Implement ethical standards agreement with contractors, and a supported action plan for those who are not yet meeting all the standards.
- DEIB:
- implement anti-bias/anti-racism trainings for all of us.
- hire anti-racism consulting around shifts in leadership structure.
- change our leadership - add Black voices to the executive team.
- share equity to Ghanaian employees.

FUTURE

By mid-2022 our goals are to:

- Hire a Ghanaian Head of Country - this is in the works now!
- Implement a wastewater treatment system for batikers: we are working with Global Mamas and an expert to develop a lowtech system, which we will put into action with the dyers we partner with.
- Move to all sustainable rayons (Lenzig), source organic cotton and linen on the African continent.
- Switch all fabric import shipping to sea.
- Create an in-house production and training facility for design, patternmaking, garment production and dyeing.
- Implement ethical standards agreement with contractors, and a supported action plan for those who are not yet meeting all the standards.
- DEIB:
- implement anti-bias/anti-racism trainings for all of us.
- hire anti-racism consulting around shifts in leadership structure.
- change our leadership - add Black voices to the executive team.
- share equity to Ghanaian employees.

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